Epiphany Ideas

The 6th of January (though some will celebrate on Sunday 3rd) marks the day when, traditionally, Christians celebrate the visit of the wise men to the Holy Family. Here are some ideas to help if you’re joining in!

Star Compass

You will need: needles, magnets, craft foam scissors, a big bowl, water, a compass or phone with a compass app,

Cut a star shape out of the craft foam. Your needle will have a sharp end and an end with an eye. Your magnet will either be labelled with a north and south pole or will have two sides. Take your needle and rub the sharp end of it over the North end of the magnet 30 times (rub in the same direction every time). If your magnet is not labelled, just choose one of the sides to start with. Now take the eye end of the needle, and rub it 30 times in the same direction over the south end (or other side) of the magnet. Thread the needle through the foam star and float the star on the water. Watch as one end of the needle gravitates and points towards the North and think about how the wise men followed the direction of the star.

Talk about: What or who helps you know where to go in your life? Are you good at knowing the way? What or who do you follow?

Pray: Ask God to help you to see the right way to go in life.

Watch the Epiphany Story Video

Make an Epiphany King Cake

Make a garland with paper stars

Print on paper with star shaped cookie cutters dipped in paint

Make and decorate star shaped biscuits

Rainbow Prayers

Rainbows have been such an important symbol during the Coronavirus crisis of how we are coming together as a community and supporting each other. Here is a prayer activity that children can easily do with their families at home.

You will need: items in the different colours of the rainbow- red, yellow, orange, green, blue, indigo and violet. You might want to make it a challenge to find one or two items of each colour inside or outside the house or you might use a product that has lots of the same things in all colours e.g. Lego

Ue the items to pray:

  • Choose a colour, hold that colour item and thank God for as many things as you can think of that are that colour too.
  • pray for people that each colour reminds you of
  • Allocate types of prayer to different colours- choose a colour and pray that prayer e.g.

red- people who are ill

orange- people who need to be brave

yellow-thanks for things that make us happy

green- the environment

blue- people who are sad

indigo- people who take care of us

violet- questions you would like to ask God

  • draw rainbows and ask God to bless people in your community. Give the pictures to neighbours or hang then in your windows

The Parable of the Pearl Lesson

When you have a range of ages in a children’s group, it’s great to provide a range of activities that are more open-ended that children can choose from.  This means that children are more likely to find something they can get on and do independently and to their own level!  Here is a session we used this month with a group of children ranging in age from 2-12.

First we organised a hunt for coloured paper squares which we had hidden around the room.  Children worked in small teams to find specific colours.IMG_0443

Next, we told the parable of the pearl. I used my Godly play set, but a version from a children’s Bible or a video of the story would work just as well.

Children could then choose from a range of related activities that helped them to explore the story themes of ‘treasure’, searching for something precious and what the kingdom of God would be like…

  • Making pearl ‘treasure’ biscuits. Click here for the link to show you how.

  • Drawing a picture of the story
  • Using play dough to make a scene from the story or to make a ‘treasure’

  • Using a range of collage materials to make ‘treasure’

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  • searching in moon sand for ‘treasure’ (glittery foam shapes, buttons, pom poms)

As the children created, we used the time to talk to them about heaven, treasure, what it must be like to give up everything for something incredibly precious and what they would have done if they had been in the story. We had some fascinating conversations!

Easter Story Stone Painting

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Stones are an important part of the Easter story because it is a massive stone that is placed in front of Jesus’ tomb and the same stone that is rolled away at the resurrection. Stones are also amazing tactile. They are something firm to hold on to and also something hard to help children to reflect on the hard times we all face in our lives. They are also a great surface to draw on and this craft was really popular at our Messy Good Friday service yesterday.

You will need:  Stones (enough for one each), paint pens, sharpies, felt tips (test the pens on your stones before starting as different types of pen work better depending on the kind of surface your stone has!)

Ask children to reflect on what they know of the story and of who Jesus is and to decorate their rock accordingly. They might want to use words or pictures or a mixture of both. Use the time they spend creating as an opportunity to speak to them about the story and what it means to them.